BUSINESS

UNKNOWN SECRETS ABOUT FANTA THAT YOU MIGHT HAVE NOT HEARD ABOUT

FANTA WAS DEVELOPED DURING NAZI GERMANY

Coca-Cola was a huge rage during the Nazi era in Germany. So, when the Coca-Cola headquarters in the United States imposed a ban on Coca-Cola Germany (Coca-Cola GmbH) post the 1941 Pearl Harbor bombing, Germans were in a fix. In a dire need for a new beverage, Max Keith thought of developing a fizz-based beverage for the Germans. By 1943, Fanta became so popular in the German market that it had sold close to 3 million cases of their new product. The launch of Fanta saved the Coca-Cola GmbH from being scrapped during the war and hence ended up becoming a symbol of nationalism.

FANTA, AS WE KNOW IT TODAY WAS RE-LAUNCHED IN ITALY

According to Atlas Obscura, the production of Fanta ended in 1945 by the time the Second World War ended. Post the success of Fanta and Coca-Cola Germany during the Second World War, Max Keith was made the Head of Coca-Cola’s operations in Europe. Since it was the introduction of Fanta that built Max Keith’s career, it was unsurprising that he reintroduced Fanta in the European market after giving it a makeover in the year 1955.

Fanta 2.0 was launched in Naples in Italy. Its first flavor was citrus-based orange and was entirely made from locally sourced ingredients. After its re-launch in Europe, it quickly became popular in South Africa and the United States and went on to be manufactured and sold in 190 other countries around the globe.

FANTA COMES IN SOME ECCENTRIC INTERNATION FLAVORS

As Fanta branched out in different countries, various regional flavors to suit the local tastes of each region were developed. So, in addition to the standard ones like orange, black cherry, strawberry, grape, lemon-lime, ginger ale, club soda, and root beer, Fanta was being sold in unusual flavors like Passionfruit Cream in Australia, Kolita in Costa Rica, and sour apple in Hong Kong. The elderflower-flavored Fanta in Germany, Malaysia’s anggur flavor, Japan’s Orange-Cola, Peach, and Muscat, and Netherlands’ Pomelo became international sensations due to their eccentric tastes.





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